PHOTOVAULT® AVIATION Museum
Commercial Aviation: the Boeing 767, Images by Wernher Krutein and PHOTOVAULT®

This page contains samples from our picture files on the Boeing 767. For Pricing, General Guidelines, and Delivery information click here. You may contact us thru email or by phone for more information on the use of these pictures, and any others in our files not shown here. Included in the Vault are images of: Jumbo Jets, Wide Body Airliners, Twin Aisle Commercial Airline Video Clips: Boeing 747, Delta 767

See Also: Commercial Aviation, AEROSPACE, TRANSPORTATION, Airports: Codes, Airlines: Codes, Washington State, Seattle, About the Boeing 767, More images of the 767
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About the Boeing 767 1978 saw the beginning of production design when an order for 30 short-to-medium-range 767s was announced by United Airlines July 14. The first 767, still owned by Boeing, was completed and rolled out of the Boeing plant in Everett, Wash., Aug. 4, 1981, and made its initial flight Sept. 26.

The stretched varient designated 767-300 got under way in September 1983. This model has a fuselage that is 21 feet 1 inch (6.43 m) longer than the 767-200, increasing seating capacity 22 percent (approximately 40 passengers) and the cargo volume by 31 percent.

Following the introduction of each model, an extended-range version was presented. To take advantage of their longer ranges and allow long, over-water flights, new features were added -- an advanced propulsion system and auxiliary power unit with high-altitude start capability, increased cargo compartment fire-suppression capability and cooling sensors for the electronic flight instruments. The 767 now crosses the Atlantic more often than any other airplane type.

The Boeing 767 provides airlines a profitable, comfortable airliner sized between the standard-body Boeing 757 and the larger, wide-body Boeing 747 and the new 777.

It makes use of new-generation technology to provide maximum efficiency in the face of rising operational costs, while extending twin-aisle passenger cabin convenience to routes never before served by wide-body airliners.

Its two-aisle passenger cabin follows the tradition of spaciousness established by the Boeing 747, first of the wide-body airliners. Extensive passenger research has shown the seven-abreast seating concept is preferred by the majority of those surveyed, because 87 percent of the seats are next to the window or on the aisles. Center seats are only one seat from an aisle. Passenger studies also rate the 767 equal to the 747 for inflight comfort.

It is estimated that 767s have carried 795 million passengers on 4.8 million flights since it first entered service on Sept. 8, 1982. Through first quarter 1996, Boeing had delivered 591 wide-body 767 airplanes.

Schedule reliability, an industry measure of departure from the gate within 15 minutes of scheduled time, is nearly 99 percent for the 767. Fleetwide, daily utilization is more than 10 hours.

Technical Improvements

The wing is thicker, longer and less swept than the wings of earlier Boeing jetliners. This provides excellent takeoff performance and fuel economy. Each 767 is powered by two high-bypass-ratio turbofan engines from General Electric, Pratt & Wh.tn.jpgey or Rolls-Royce.

With its advanced-design wing and powerful engines, the basic 767-200, at a maximum gross weight of 300,000 pounds (136,080 kg), can take off in only 5,600 feet (1,707 m). It can operate non-stop between New York and San Francisco with a two-class load of 224 passengers. Even the highest gross weight version, the 767-200ER (extended range) model with a maximum takeoff weight of 395,000 pounds (179,172 kg), can take off in about 9,400 feet (2,865 m). It can reach up to 7,660 statute miles (12,330 km), making possible such non-stop flights as New York to Beirut, London to Bombay and Tokyo to Sydney with 181 passengers in a three-class configuration.

767-300

The basic 767-300 has a maximum takeoff weight of 345,000 pounds (156,492 kg) and can carry a two-class load of 269 passengers 4,560 statute miles (7,340 km). The highest gross weight 767-300ER, at 412,000 pounds (186,883 kg) maximum takeoff weight, can carry 218 passengers in three-class configuration 7,080 statute miles (11,400 km).

Payload Capability

The 767-200 cabin, more than 4 feet wider than the single-aisle Boeing jetliners, seats about 224 passengers in a typical mixed-class configuration (six-abreast in first-class, seven-abreast in tourist class). Many other arrangements are possible, including up to 325 passengers in eight-abreast seating for charter flights in the -300.

The extended range airplanes typically have three-class seating of 181 to 218 passengers, using five-abreast 747-sized first class seats, six-abreast business class and seven-abreast economy class.

Lower-deck volume available for baggage and cargo totals 3,070 cubic feet (86.9 cubic meters) for the -200 and 4,030 cubic feet (114.2 cubic meters) for the -300, more than 45 percent greater than the lower-deck capacity of the 707 and more than any commercial transport in its class.

Extended-Range Operations

In May 1985, the Federal Aviation Administration approved 767s for long-range flights of up to 120 minutes from a suitable airport. In March 1989, the FAA approved the 767 for 180-minute extended twin-engine operation (ETOPS). This allows more direct time-saving trans-Pacific and trans-Atlantic flights from many U.S. gateways.

 

767 -- Additional Facts

767 -- Basic Specifications

767-200/-200ER

Wing Span

156 feet 1 inches (47.6 m)

Overall Length

159 feet 2 inches (48.5 m)

Fuselage Length

155 feet (47.2 m)

Tail Height

52 feet (15.8 m)

Body Width

16.5 feet (5 m)

Passengers

  • 181 (three-class)
  • 224 (two-class)
  • up to 285 (charter)

Cargo Volume

3,070 cubic feet (86.9 cubic meters)

Engines (two)

  • Pratt & Wh.tn.jpgey PW4000
  • General Electric CF6-80C2
  • Rolls-Royce RB211-524G/H

Maximum rated thrust per engine

50,000 pounds to 62,000 pounds

Fuel Capacity

16,700 gallons (63,200 L) to 24,140 gallons (91,400 L) in extended range version

Maximum Takeoff Weight

 

767-200 basic

300,000 pounds (136,080 kg)

767-200 max

335,000 pounds (151,956 kg)

767-200ER basic

345,000 pounds (156,492 kg)

767-200ER max

395,000 pounds (179,172 kg)

Maximum Range

 

767-200

5,260 miles (8,465 km)

767-200ER

7,660 miles (12,330 km)

767-300/-300ER

Wing Span

156 feet 1 inches (47.6 m)

Overall Length

180 feet 3 inches (54.9 m)

Fuselage Length

176 feet 1 inches (53.7 m)

Tail Height

52 feet (15.8 m)

Body Width

16.5 feet (5 m)

Passengers

  • 218 (three-class)
  • 269 (two-class)
  • up to 325 (charter)

Cargo Volume

4,030 cubic feet (114.2 cubic meters)

Engines (two)

  • Pratt & Wh.tn.jpgey PW4000
  • General Electric CF6-80C2
  • Rolls-Royce RB211-524G/H

Maximum rated thrust per engine

50,000 pounds to 62,000 pounds

Fuel Capacity

16,700 gallons (63,200 L) to 24,140 gallons (91,400 L) in extended range version

Maximum Takeoff Weight

 

767-300 basic

345,000 pounds (156,490 kg)

767-300

351,000 pounds (159,213 kg)

767-300ER basic

380,000 pounds (172,368 kg)

767-300ER max

412,000 pounds (186,883 kg)

Maximum Range

 

767-300

4,300 miles (7,340 km)

767-300ER

6,830 miles (10,990 km)



PHOTOVAULT ® AVIATION Museum contains a collection of historical photographs starting from the 1940's. Many pictures of airlines and types of airplanes. The following are links to most of the major existing commercial aircraft types: Airbus: A-300, A-310, A-320, A-330, A-340, A-380, Airspeed: Ambassador, Antonov: An-2, An-24, An-124, Avion de Transport Régional: ATR 42, ATR 72, British Aerospace: BAC-111, BAe/AVRO-146, BAe 748/ATP/Jetstream 61, BAe Jetstream31, Beech 1900, 99, Boeing: B-247, B-307, B-377, B-707, B-717, B-727, B-737, B-747, B-757, B-767, B-777, B-787, Breguet: 761 Deux Ponts, Britten-Norman: Trislander, Islander, Canadair: Regional Jet CRJ, Convair: 240 thru 680, 880 and 990, Curtis-Wright: CW-20, de Havilland: DH89, DH104, DH106 Comet, Dash-7, Dash-8, DHC-6 Twin Otter, Caribou, Trident, DinfiaI: A-50 Guarani, Dornier: 228, 328, Embraer: Bandeirante EMB-110, Brasilia EMB-120, ERJ-145, Fairchild: Metroliner, Fokker: F-27, F-50, F-28, F-70, F-100, Ford: Trimotor, Grumman: Goose, Ilyushin: Il-14, Il-18, Il-62, Il-86, Lockheed: Constellation, Electra, L-1011, L-100, Martin: 404, McDonnell Douglas (Boeing): DC-3, DC-6, DC-8, DC-9, DC-10, MD-80's, MD-90's, MD-11, SAAB: 340 & 2000, Short: 330 and 360, Sandringham, Sikorsky: VS44, Tupolev, Tu-104, Tu-134, Tu-154, The Concorde SST, SUD Caravelle, NAMC YS-11, Vickers: Viscount, Yakovlev: Yak 40, VFW-614

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